New epoch in geologic time: Anthropocene

Earth and its epochs extend so far back in time that it is beyond comprehension.  I recently came across a  TED post that talks about a movement afoot among  geologists and other scientists to identify a new Epoch in Earth’s geology marked by the impact of man.  It would be called the Anthropocene.  I highly recommend that you take a look at this fascinating and readable article by David Biello, an award winning journalist and science curator for TED. He has a new book, coming out in November,”The Unnatural World,” which discusses Anthropocene.

To set the stage I have gathered some background tidbits:

  • Earth is about 4.54 billion years old;
  • If introduced, Anthropocene would end the Holocene Epoch which began 11,700 years ago;
  • Holocene began after the Ice Age.  The Ice Age extended from 110,000 years ago to 12,000 years ago;
  • The timing of the new Epoch is still being debated, but there is strong support for 1950, as the time when significant changes in air, soil, water, and rocks (caused by human activity) could first be identified.

Anthropocene david biello.jpg

…the point of naming the Anthropocene is not to memorialize humanity in the rock record. The point of the Anthropocene [‘new age of man’] is to recognize people’s world-changing impacts in the hopes of persuading us to take a slightly less anthropocentric approach. People need to make room for plants and animals if we want to avoid another mass extinction…. The world’s pollution problems have to be addressed together, or they won’t be solved at all.

In short, the point of an Anthropocene is to prove that humanity is actually not like a glacier or an asteroid. We can choose to do better…
——From  TED Ideas article:  You have been living in a new geologic time all along, by David Biello

 

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Thank you for reading my Sunday quote post, number 3 in a series of three for a Three Day Quote Challenge. I would like to thank Louise Farrell of Fantasy Raconteur for inviting me.  I love this challenge as it gives me a nudge to do a kind of post that is rewarding.

As  part of the challenge tradition I invite three other bloggers to join in.  Today I choose three nominees who as usual I ask to not feel in any way obliged to follow through.  My nominees today are:

 A Cooking Pot and Twisted Tales

Ladyleemanila

 Rafiki’s Nikki

The ‘Rules’ or suggested guidelines are:

  1. Thank the person that nominated you.
  2. Post 1-3 quotes each day for 3 consecutive days.
  3. Nominate 3 bloggers each day to participate in the 3-day Quote Challenge.
  4. Have fun. Bend the rules.

Hidden potential

Processed with Snapseed.
Lettuce flowers

We often grow plants for their leaves–for example lettuce, spinach, basil and parsley yield delicious salad greens and herbs.  In a typical growth cycle leaves and stems appear and then flowers, seeds, and sometimes fruit. Yet, when plants cultivated for leaves mature, we say they are ‘bolting’. For us, they are running out of control—in reality, they are bolting to their natural destiny.

This summer a few lettuce plants in my garden bolted so I decided to leave them to see what would happen. Oval green buds formed until one day little yellow flowers appeared. A quick internet search informed me that lettuce is a member of the Daisy family!  Who knew? Here are a couple of haiku on the topic:

Salad shoots

to golden starlets—

Talent shines.

Potential unleashed

Slender stems grow tender buds—

bursting daisy stars.

©2016, Ontheland.wordpress.com

The current theme of TJ’s Household Haiku, posted every Saturday, is ‘Bud’.

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PEACE POEM PUBLISHED!!! – #PoetsForPeace

Peace Poem 2016, a chain of over 250 poems by writers from all over the world, is now available for download at Praxis Online Magazine—a wonderful celebration of International Day of Peace. I and many other WordPress bloggers participated this year and I hope many more will join in to speak out for peace in 2017.

forgottenmeadows

image copyright neha 2016 image copyright neha 2016

Hello Everyone!

Michael, Marie and I are so excited to announce that #PoetsForPeace is now LIVE and PUBLISHED in Praxis Magazine Online! We are so grateful to  Laura M Kaminski and Tee Jay Dan, editors at Praxis, for giving us this wonderful opportunity and working tirelessly in helping us get published!

We would especially like to thank all our contributors who helped make this project successful! We could not have done this without you!

You can view and download the publication here: http://www.praxismagonline.com/peace-poem-2016-poetsforpeace-collaboration/

We are thrilled that this collaboration will also be archived in the ‘Stanford University Archive’ of the ‘100,000 Poets for Change’ collection!

We hope you can all join us next year as we aim to make #PoetsForPeace a growing annual event!

Share and Spread the word with your friends and family! Please use #PoetsForPeace!

Cheers to #PoetsForPeace!

Michael, Marie & Neha

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We protect World Peace by supporting Climate Action

 

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We attribute ancient hatreds, religious intolerance or simply greed to many of the current conflicts. However, from desertification to eroding shores, climate change has intensified resource scarcity, poverty and hunger. Vast new waves of migration may have a political ignition, but the fuel is climate change, from Africa to Asia. Somehow, even Syria’s conflict can be attributed to the spark of longer-term drought. No continent has been secure, including the more developed ones.

Muhamed Sacirbey

Often war and terror are seen as greater global threats than climate change.  This view does not recognize that environmental stress fuels violent conflict. How?  Global warming creates stressors such as drought, famine, insect infestations, destruction of food supplies and destruction of shelter (think floods, fire, hurricanes).  Such disasters lead to mass migrations.  As Muhamed Sacirbey notes in the above quote, hunger and dislocation are sparks that ignite conflict.

Hunger—conflict—depletion of arable land—conflict—water shortages—conflict—failed crops—conflict—homes destroyed by natural disasters—migration—friction between migrants and natives—conflict—military zones—persecution—migration—conflict.  Food, water, arable land, and places to live are essentials that people fight  for in times of scarcity.

A United Nations Global Trends Report released in June 2016 states that worldwide forced displacement has reached an all-time high: in 2015, one in every 113 humans (65.3 million people) were displaced from their homes due to violence and persecution.

Addressing climate change by reducing carbon emissions promotes World Peace.

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Thank you for reading my Sunday quote post, number 2 in a series of three for a Three Day Quote Challenge. I would like to thank Louise Farrell of Fantasy Raconteur for inviting me.  I love this challenge as it gives me a nudge to do a kind of post that I enjoy.

As  part of the challenge tradition I invite three other bloggers to join in if it strikes their fancy.  Before I list the nominees for this week, I would like to talk about using quotes in posts.  When I first started blogging I was mystified by references to quote challenges until I discovered what it was all about from reading blog posts,  particularly those linked to Writer’s Quote Wednesday Writing Challenge, hosted by Colleen Chesebro and Ronovan Hester.  There are many approaches to using quotes in posts, for example:

  • posting a quote and letting it speak for itself
  • posting a quote and expanding on its meaning or significance, sometimes with information about the author
  • posting a quote to supplement photography (some people come up with amazing combinations)
  • an introductory, tone-setting quote
  • a closing quote
  • using a quote as inspiration for poetry or prose
  • using a quote to enrich the body of a post
  • using your own words as a quote!

If you have a secret desire to try a 3-quote challenge, let me know and I will  nominate you next week. For today I have chosen three nominees who I ask to not feel in any way obliged to follow through—not all bloggers enjoy this type of challenge.  My nominees today are:

Eli Woodbine 

Magarisa of  Becoming Unstuck

Yazek of Successia

The ‘Rules’ or suggested guidelines are:

  1. Thank the person that nominated you.
  2. Post 1-3 quotes each day for 3 consecutive days.
  3. Nominate 3 bloggers each day to participate in the 3-day Quote Challenge.
  4. Have fun.

Harvest Full Moon on Friday

The harvest full moon will be this Friday evening—in fact, the moon has been bright all week allowing me to work later outside.  I wrote a haiku:

Moon companion

Cool night-air harvest humming

Hearts rise to her glow.

©ontheland

Harvest Full Moon can fall in September or October.  This year it is the September 16 moon, being the closest full moon to the Autumnal Equinox (coming up on September 22). When not hosting Harvest Moon, September’s full moon has other names such as ‘Full Corn Moon’ and ‘Barley Moon’.

You may have heard that there will be a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse on Friday.  This means that the sun, earth, and moon will line up so that some of the sun’s light will be blocked by the earth’s outer shadow.  The outer shadow is so faint that many people will not notice that the full moon is dimmed.  I am not an astronomer, but learned this eclipse information at Timeanddate.

 

Waiting

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Watched, watching, on edge,

Alert, still, a sentinel—

near garden clearing.

Waiting, expecting

today’s magic appearance—

 Carrot offering.

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©2016, ontheland.wordpress.com

This rabbit was on the edge of my garden and probably on edge, with me standing nearby —I wanted to move closer, but knew he would run when I moved.  TJ’s Household Haiku prompt ‘Edge’ gave me a way to tell this story with haiku. Some of my readers will recall that earlier this summer there was much munching in my garden—a widespread challenge due to the drought conditions, I am told by a local newspaper.  To this day I have been putting carrots out to curb their appetites.