May the road rise up to meet you

In response to On the Road—The Journey Begins:

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May you walk with ease

along a well-marked path

May your load be light.

∼ ∼ ∼

When mantras hum

the road carries me

cares dissolve

the journey and I 

are one again.

∼ ∼ ∼

Suzanne is launching a new bi-weekly prompt series called ‘On the Road—Prompts for Haiku, Haibun and Haiku.’  The introductory post explains her vision:

We are all travelling some kind of road – the road of life – the road to the deep interior – the road to nowhere – the road to recovery – the road home …  Our journeys can be physical and/or metaphorical;  inner and outer.

On the Road prompts focus on various aspects of the journey.  Two prompts are posted each week.  One on Wednesday and the other on Saturday (Australian EST).

The prompts are offered as suggestions for haiku, haibun and haiga.

The first prompt is an old Irish blessing “May the Road Rise up to Meet You”.  My first response is a haiku and the second is a tanka.  After I wrote it I realized that a tanka may be outside the scope of this challenge…that remains to be clarified.

©2017 Ontheland

Soaking up the rays

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Soaking up the rays

after choosing ‘right’ cushion

communal pleasure

Moments before this peaceful scene they jostled and jumped from cushion to cushion until everyone settled down.  The fourth cushion could have been occupied, but our orange-haired cat tends to shun community events and the elderly dog currently visiting backed off when cushion selection became hectic (despite my efforts to help out).

I decided to write a haiku today after reading an essay by the late Haiku poet, Jane Reichhold (1937-2016) about composing haiku with a fragment and a phrase.  Her fragment and phrase theory makes sense to me.  Perhaps even more interesting are her words about how she related to haiku writing guidelines.  Here is a small excerpt:

There is, thank goodness, no one way to write a haiku. Though the literature has haiku which we admire and even model our own works on, there is no one style or technique which is absolutely the best. Haiku is too large for that. Haiku has, in its short history been explored and expanded by writers so that now we have a fairly wide range of styles, techniques and methods to investigate.

To read her full essay please visit Carpe Diem Universal Jane #17 fragment and phrase.

©2017 Ontheland

May rains

We’ve had an unusual stretch of rain and clouds. 

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such abundance!

the creek is now a river

tumbling to the lake

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city pond

new willow tresses

fill mirror 

After days of rain

faithful gardener returns

to kneel, sprinkling seeds

©2017 Ontheland

about haiku (2)

Writing about ‘writing haiku’ captured my imagination.  I woke up scribbling yesterday morning:

Poems float gently

in a breeze of syllables

haiku-dusted sky

From hill to valley

rushing waters stir my heart—

cleansing tears bear joy.

A word plops

on a silent pond

haiku ripple.

This is my second response to Carpe Diem Tokubetsudesu Special #1 “The Poet’s Craft”. In this Carpe Diem Haiku Kai episode, guest writer, Kim Russell, invites us to write haiku about writing haiku.